Feb. 23rd, 2016

shiori_makiba: Makiba Shiori in Kanji and Roman Letters (Default)
Poem: A Father's Love
by shiori_makiba
Word Count: 440 words in 72 lines.

George is a father. 

Inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] kay_brooke  for the February 2016 Thank Muse Its Friday session.

Note: George is not part of the 'Ohana polyfamily but he is their neighbor.

Warning!: Death of a loved one (not the child), grieving, current environment is supportive.

 

Read more... )
shiori_makiba: Makiba Shiori in Kanji and Roman Letters (Default)
Poem: Domesticity

by shiori_makiba

Words: 461 in 81 lines

Margaret, a cis woman, and Beatrice, a trans woman, are happily married with children.

Inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] chanter_greenie for the February 2016 Thank Muse Its Friday session.

Note: Margaret and Beatrice are not part of the 'Ohana polyfamily but they are their neighbors.

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Acronyms

Feb. 23rd, 2016 05:51 pm
shiori_makiba: Makiba Shiori in Kanji and Roman Letters (Default)
Do you think we are over-using them?

Acronyms can be handy. But they can also be confusing.

Writing rules recommend defining what the acronym means the first time it is used in the body of work. Like Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) the first time and then using FBI onward.

The problem is that unless that acronym is common parlance, it can be easy to forget what it means.

Especially if your brain is like mine. I'm dyslexic. This means that words, letters, numbers, etc often do not arrive at their destination in the same condition in which they left their starting point. For example, I might write mibble school when I meant to write middle school. And my brain would think it was written correctly until I looked at it much later.

I can't speak for other dyslexics but I have found some letters and numbers are particularly prone to getting lost or switching places with one of the other letters or numbers.

For me, it is mostly the ones are similar looking like B and D.

Or sequences that use the same numbers in a different order. For example, when I worked as a cashier, ringing up fresh produce was done using a 4 digit code. Two of those were 4545 and 4554. One was zucchini and one was for cucumbers. You had to get them right since the zucchini was sold by weight and the cucumbers by piece. I cannot tell you how many times I put in zucchini when I meant to enter cucumber. Or vice versa. It didn't help that the two items in question look alike.

Unfamiliar words are also prone to getting their letters switched around when I'm trying to spell them.

Acronyms, until I get really familiar with them, automatically hit the scrambler. On both ends, trying to write/speak them AND trying to remember what it means. Even familiar ones can hit a roadblock of confusion if I haven't seen or used them in a while.

Which is probably why trying to read that article about assigned gender at birth has given me a headache. I can hammer in those acronyms in if it is really that offensive to say physical sex. But the learning curve will be steep.
shiori_makiba: Makiba Shiori in Kanji and Roman Letters (Default)

Poem: Goofy Socks

by shiori_makiba

Word Count: 523 words in 84 lines

Part of the 'Ohana universe but doesn't just involve the polyfamily.

This poem was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] dialecticdreamer for Thank Muse Its Friday February 2016 session.



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